Tino interviewed Sally Brockway about her business

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Tino: Welcome back to Business First TV, my name is Tino. Whatever content you have, whether it be a letter, creating a website, or writing a blog, it's always worth having somebody on board who can help you with the right words to use. As entrepreneurs of course, we think we know everything. We got ahead and have a go, we think we've done it to the best of our ability, but sometimes the best of our ability just isn't that good because we say it how we think it should be said instead of how, perhaps our audience should see it. To that end, we need somebody on board who can help us, and today I have with me Sally Brockway of Wow PR. Hi Sally, how are you?
Sally: I'm good, thank you very much. Good to see you.
Tino: Good editing there?
Sally: Very good.
Tino: What is it that you do?
Sally: I've been a journalist for 30 years. I know it's incredible, isn't it?
Tino: Yes, it is.
Sally: Yeah, and in November of last year, I started my own PR company. The reason being, my sister has a PR company and she asked me to take over while she had a holiday, which I did. I really enjoyed it, and I thought, I'm really good at this, and actually my skill set translates really well into PR. I find it quite exciting placing articles on the behalf of somebody else's business. It's a bit like gambling. You get a hit, and it's a bit of a buzz.
So I thought there's a really good fit for my skill set. Print journalism is kind of dying a slow and agonising death and when it goes down I want to be on a nice life raft, so here I am.
Tino: That's amazing. I mean 30 years as a journalist is a long time-
Sally: It is a long time.
Tino: A lot of experience, you know. Exciting stories? Anything really exciting happen that you write about?
Sally: Well I-
Tino: That you can talk about?
Sally: I did work at the Sun for two years.
Tino: Oh really?
Sally: I am essentially a tabloid journalist, so my skill is making things simple to understand. I can take something quite complicated and simplify it and then present it to the lay person. I specialised in show business for quite a while, so I've met most of the key people on British TV, Bruce Forsyth, and I met Ronnie Corbett, that was before he passed away, and a lot of the soap stars. So, that's what I had been doing previously.
Tino: Who are you looking for ideally? Who is your ideal client? Who would you like to work with?
Sally: I want to work with exciting businesses, people that are passionate about what they do, because I need to be excited about my client. If I'm not, it's just not gonna work. People who want to communicate a bit better, who maybe want some stories in the local press, perhaps they want some guest blogs on other websites, they want to get their message out there. They say, "I've got this great business, but nobody knows where I am, or who I am." So it's my job to come along and put them on the map basically.
Tino: Okay, and how long have you been doing this again now?
Sally: I've been doing this since November last year.
Tino: Okay, all right. You work with lots of small businesses. You come across a lot of small businesses.
Sally: Yes.
Tino: It's fair to say that us small businesses, we try to have a go, and we get it wrong don't we?
Sally: Yes, but I'm not an accountant. I'm not very good at adding up, so I employ someone to do my accounting for me. It's a similar thing. It's no different.
Tino: What sort of horror stories have you come across?
Sally: Well, I've met businesses who have great stories, and I went to a networking event, and I spoke to this chat who had a business. I will tell you what it is because you might recognise himself. It was so interesting because I am essentially a journalist, so I listen for a story, and I know if I hear something interesting. I said, "That's really good. That's a great story for the press." Then he'll say, "Oh, I sent it to the press, and they turned me down." Then he'll tell me how he presented, and inside I'm thinking oh no, no, because a good story has to be told well, because if you tell it badly, people don't realise it is a good story.
Tino: Yes absolutely.
Sally: So what I find is, it's just because I've been a journalist, I know how they think. I know they want in their inbox. I know how they want things presented. I know it will excite them, and I know what to say when I then phone them up. I don't want to be that, "Oh, it's another PR for you." because I've been that journalists going, "Oh God, it's a PR on the phone." I want to be the PR they actually want to speak to. So I've kind of got an advantage, in that I know the mean mindset of the media.
Tino: As a small business, how are you doing your marketing? What are you doing about that?
Sally: I'm networking a lot. I go to business breakfast at 6:30 in the morning, which is very early even though there is bacon, it's still very early. I mean obviously, because I've been around for quite a long time, like yourself.
Tino: I've been around for a long time.
Sally: I know a lot of people, and that helps because what you do is you say, "Do you know what, I'm going out to do PR." Because people know that as a freelance journalist, I'm reliable, I'm efficient, and I do a good job. So obviously, they're going to assume that I'll be doing the same in a PR capacity. So a lot of my work is word of mouth, because people trust me. Then I'm networking, and I'm getting to know other businesses, because I've got to get to know people. Is no point in me bowling in and going, "Here I am." They need to get to know me a bit. So I'm doing a lot of networking basically.
Tino: As a small business then, what sorts of challenges have you come across?
Sally: Well my challenge in the field of PR is, PR is really hard to explain to people. They go, "What is it?" It's not like this cup. I can show you, there's this cup and it's blue. It's a hard thing to explain. So there's a real difficulty. I'm trying to sell something to people they don't really understand. I've just taken on a new client, who is a reasonably sized business. So they understand PR. When I speak to them about it, they just get it. They're like, "Brilliant, let's go for it." So it's quite difficult with the smaller businesses, to explain what I can do for them.
Tino: All right, but what can you do for them?
Sally: Well-
Tino: In simple terms, what is PR?
Sally: Well I'll give you an example. Somebody I know runs a screenwriting competition.
Tino: A screen, okay-
Sally: So every year he runs a competition. People enter, there's a lot of big names from the TV industry who judge, and the winner will get to meet these big names. So he said to me, "Look, I spent 1,000 pounds on PR last year." I said, "Well, what did you get?" He went, "I didn't get anything." What do you mean you didn't get anything, what happened? Well I went and I said, "Here's my money," and they said, "Yeah, we'll this we'll do that," and then they said, "Well, we contacted a few radio stations, but no one was interested, best of luck."
So I said, "Right, you give me that 1,000 pounds and let's see what I can do." So the following year, I took the 1,000 pounds. I looked at his competition and thought well, the whole point of this is, it's a competition for people interested in screenwriting. So there's no point of it being in say, Women's Weekly, because they might not be interested in screenwriting. So where do I find those people? So the first thing I did was I placed a piece of Broadcast, which is the television industry publication. So I thought that's a good place to start, and how I did that was, because some of the judges were big name people. So if somebody like Kate Oates from Coronation Street is behind the competition, you're gonna get a mention.
Tino: Okay.
Sally: So that was the first thing I did, and because I did that, the Royal Television Society did a little news piece on it, and somebody else did. That was rippling away quite nicely. Then I went on to Twitter, and I noticed that one of the judges with the scriptwriter, and I thought oh, a lot of the people have a lot of Twitter followers. If I asked them to tweak this competition, the message might get out there. That was another thing I did. They tweeted it, and the message got out there.
So then I thought, well this guy who has the competition is in Brighton, let's see if we can get some local press. So I got him two local pieces, in the local press, and I got him an interview with the local television station.
Tino: Oh wow.
Sally: Then I thought, well where else the screenwriters go?
Tino: Do you know, for 1,000 pounds that's a lot going on there.
Sally: Exactly. So the final thing was, well a lot of people who want to get into screenwriting go on to blogs, so I got him six guest blogs. He got an increase of 20% in entries that year. So that is what PR is.
Tino: Okay, so getting the message out there.
Sally: Getting it out to the right people, because there's no point telling people who are interested in building, what about this screenwriting contest. It's got to be the right market, the right audience.
Tino: How does somebody pick a good PR person, being that there are so many out there?
Sally: Well they just go with me, and forget about the rest.
Tino: They you go.
Sally: I would just look at their experience really. It's when you meet someone, it's gotta be a good fit for your business. If someone's eyes light up when you're talking about your business to them, they are possibly a good fit. I think instinct is really important.
Tino: So if the person you're talking to gets to be passionate about your business, understands your business, wants to be involved in your business, then that's a good sign I think.
Sally: Yes, because the PR accounts I'm looking after, they're in my mind most of the time. I come up with little ideas, and I email, "Hey I just had this idea, what do you think about this?" You've got to be excited about.
Tino: Is 1,000 pounds a lot of money for a small business to pay out, in your opinion?
Sally: Well, it depends, doesn't it really?
Tino: It does.
Sally: Because he paid out 1,000 pounds the year before, and got nothing. Whereas he paid ... If you had taken advertising space out in those different platforms, it would've cost you a lot more than 1,000 pounds, so I don't think it's a lot of money.
Tino: In my view, 1,000 pounds not a lot of money. You've done your one type of marketing, how are you on social media? What is it that you do there?
Sally: I think social media is really important. Now, when I started in journalism, back in the day, when dinosaurs roamed the earth-
Tino: You're not that old. I'm not that old.
Sally: You'd write a story, and it would go in the newspaper 24 hours later. That felt quite immediate. It's not like that now. Something happens, it's out there in a flash. So that's quite exciting in terms of PR, because you can literally get your message out there right away. So any PR strategy has to use social media, websites, blogs, it's really important. I love social media. I'm totally addicted to Twitter and Facebook.
Tino: Are you?
Sally: Yes, it's terrible. Is a terrible thing, I'm always looking at pictures of cats, and people falling into swimming pools. It's just crazy.
Tino: I had no idea, okay.
Sally: I think blogging is very important, because ... I mean you must, as a technical person you know that it improves your SEO ranking. It keeps your website fresh. It keeps changing. Also, people need to look to you as the chosen expert in that field. PR, I'll go and read that woman's account. So I'm currently doing a series of blogs about social media. It's things like twit proof Twitter, Facebook for four year olds, easy peasy social media, because a lot of people my age say, "Oh, I don't like it."
Tino: Are they business people?
Sally: And they're business people. So my blogs are speaking to them and saying, "Do you know what, it sounds a bit scary, but actually, if I can do it you can do it."
Tino: Yeah, I like you, think social media is a wonderful tool to use. I think every small business you get on board. If you are the type of person who does hands off, and backs off, there are experts out there who can help you, who will do it for you. So just find yourself somebody who can help you in social media. It's really important that you get out there and use it. What else do you do for people?
Sally: I write blogs for people, because I love communicating. So I will write blogs, I will look at website copy for them. I will say, "Look I'm not sure this is working" because there's nothing worse than a website with swathes of sort of words that don't really mean anything. People want to go on and get a really quickly, and because my background is in tabloid journalism, I'm quite good at that, just getting things across quickly. So any kind of copywriting, I can help you with.
Tino: Do you think we live in a world of instant?
Sally: We do.
Tino: We send a message out, we expect an instant reply.
Sally: Yeah.
Tino: And perhaps the small business person, of our age isn't quite there yet.
Sally: No.
Tino: You never can like, "I better check my Twitter account once every six months perhaps." In the meantime somebody has gone, "I want to do some work with you. I want to work with you." And they've given up now.
Sally: That's the thing about social media, you've got to be on top of it. You've got to kind of buy into it. You either buy into it or you don't do it, because if you haven't got somebody monitoring what's coming in, you might have customers asking questions, and if you're not answering back ... That's like having a shop, and being in there, and just waving at the customers outside.
Tino: That's not good. I mean as small business people, we're very aware, we're very good at having a go, but were quite rubbish at building websites. We're quite rubbish at putting content on websites. We're quite rubbish at social media. That's where you can really help us out.
Sally: Yes, I mean the thing about it, I don't build websites. I have someone that builds them for me. So I work with someone else. I work with a designer. I do the things that I'm really good at, and I've got really good people who work with. I've got a great designer. I've got a great web designer, and if got a great photographer. So it's getting those people to work with me.
Tino: How do people find out more?
Sally: Well, they go my website, Wow PR Limited, and send me an email. Phone me, we're gonna have a chat.
Tino: Just remind us of your website address.
Sally: It is www.wowpr.co.uk is that right.
Tino: On Twitter, you're wowprUK?
Sally: I'm @wowprUK on Twitter. I've got a Facebook page.
Tino: Before you go, before we wrap it up, tell us about, are there social media platforms for certain types of businesses, or does it matter?
Sally: There really are, and it is quite complicated, so unless you've got four days. Yes, there are.
Tino: If I were into-
Sally: For example, just say you were an interior designer-
Tino: Yes.
Sally: And you were about image. You were having pictures of lovely rooms. I'd be on Instagram, because it's about the pictures isn't it. It's not really about the words. You've got your hashtags, but it's about, look at this beautiful design. So it's a very, very visual platform. So they're very different. Twitter is quite fast moving and quick, and perhaps your lovely rooms won't get the attention that they deserve. They'll be better off on Pinterest, or Instagram.
Tino: All right.
Sally: And also, what I like about, I mean for example, I have a couple local twitter accounts, and I try and target local followers, because there's no point in getting loads of followers in Dubai, because they want to remove stuff in Surrey. Again, it always comes down to reaching the right audience.
Tino: So to summarise then, if you have a website, and you're looking for some content, please call Sally. You've got her details already, but go to wowpr.co.uk.
Sally: Yes.
Tino: Of even find her on Twitter.com/wowpruk. We, as entrepreneurs were good at something. We're not good at everything, but a strength as you have is being able to accept that you're not strong at everything, and that you have to let go. This is where people like Sally, or just Sally herself can help you. Thanks for watching.
Sally: Thank you.
Tino: Welcome back to Business First TV, my name is Tino. Whatever content you have, whether it be a letter, creating a website, or writing a blog, it's always worth having somebody on board who can help you with the right words to use. As entrepreneurs of course, we think we know everything. We got ahead and have a go, we think we've done it to the best of our ability, but sometimes the best of our ability just isn't that good because we say it how we think it should be said instead of how, perhaps our audience should see it. To that end, we need somebody on board who can help us, and today I have with me Sally Brockway of Wow PR. Hi Sally, how are you?
Sally: I'm good, thank you very much. Good to see you.
Tino: Good editing there?
Sally: Very good.
Tino: What is it that you do?
Sally: I've been a journalist for 30 years. I know it's incredible, isn't it?
Tino: Yes, it is.
Sally: Yeah, and in November of last year, I started my own PR company. The reason being, my sister has a PR company and she asked me to take over while she had a holiday, which I did. I really enjoyed it, and I thought, I'm really good at this, and actually my skill set translates really well into PR. I find it quite exciting placing articles on the behalf of somebody else's business. It's a bit like gambling. You get a hit, and it's a bit of a buzz.
So I thought there's a really good fit for my skill set. Print journalism is kind of dying a slow and agonising death and when it goes down I want to be on a nice life raft, so here I am.
Tino: That's amazing. I mean 30 years as a journalist is a long time-
Sally: It is a long time.
Tino: A lot of experience, you know. Exciting stories? Anything really exciting happen that you write about?
Sally: Well I-
Tino: That you can talk about?
Sally: I did work at the Sun for two years.
Tino: Oh really?
Sally: I am essentially a tabloid journalist, so my skill is making things simple to understand. I can take something quite complicated and simplify it and then present it to the lay person. I specialised in show business for quite a while, so I've met most of the key people on British TV, Bruce Forsyth, and I met Ronnie Corbett, that was before he passed away, and a lot of the soap stars. So, that's what I had been doing previously.
Tino: Who are you looking for ideally? Who is your ideal client? Who would you like to work with?
Sally: I want to work with exciting businesses, people that are passionate about what they do, because I need to be excited about my client. If I'm not, it's just not gonna work. People who want to communicate a bit better, who maybe want some stories in the local press, perhaps they want some guest blogs on other websites, they want to get their message out there. They say, "I've got this great business, but nobody knows where I am, or who I am." So it's my job to come along and put them on the map basically.
Tino: Okay, and how long have you been doing this again now?
Sally: I've been doing this since November last year.
Tino: Okay, all right. You work with lots of small businesses. You come across a lot of small businesses.
Sally: Yes.
Tino: It's fair to say that us small businesses, we try to have a go, and we get it wrong don't we?
Sally: Yes, but I'm not an accountant. I'm not very good at adding up, so I employ someone to do my accounting for me. It's a similar thing. It's no different.
Tino: What sort of horror stories have you come across?
Sally: Well, I've met businesses who have great stories, and I went to a networking event, and I spoke to this chat who had a business. I will tell you what it is because you might recognise himself. It was so interesting because I am essentially a journalist, so I listen for a story, and I know if I hear something interesting. I said, "That's really good. That's a great story for the press." Then he'll say, "Oh, I sent it to the press, and they turned me down." Then he'll tell me how he presented, and inside I'm thinking oh no, no, because a good story has to be told well, because if you tell it badly, people don't realise it is a good story.
Tino: Yes absolutely.
Sally: So what I find is, it's just because I've been a journalist, I know how they think. I know they want in their inbox. I know how they want things presented. I know it will excite them, and I know what to say when I then phone them up. I don't want to be that, "Oh, it's another PR for you." because I've been that journalists going, "Oh God, it's a PR on the phone." I want to be the PR they actually want to speak to. So I've kind of got an advantage, in that I know the mean mindset of the media.
Tino: As a small business, how are you doing your marketing? What are you doing about that?
Sally: I'm networking a lot. I go to business breakfast at 6:30 in the morning, which is very early even though there is bacon, it's still very early. I mean obviously, because I've been around for quite a long time, like yourself.
Tino: I've been around for a long time.
Sally: I know a lot of people, and that helps because what you do is you say, "Do you know what, I'm going out to do PR." Because people know that as a freelance journalist, I'm reliable, I'm efficient, and I do a good job. So obviously, they're going to assume that I'll be doing the same in a PR capacity. So a lot of my work is word of mouth, because people trust me. Then I'm networking, and I'm getting to know other businesses, because I've got to get to know people. Is no point in me bowling in and going, "Here I am." They need to get to know me a bit. So I'm doing a lot of networking basically.
Tino: As a small business then, what sorts of challenges have you come across?
Sally: Well my challenge in the field of PR is, PR is really hard to explain to people. They go, "What is it?" It's not like this cup. I can show you, there's this cup and it's blue. It's a hard thing to explain. So there's a real difficulty. I'm trying to sell something to people they don't really understand. I've just taken on a new client, who is a reasonably sized business. So they understand PR. When I speak to them about it, they just get it. They're like, "Brilliant, let's go for it." So it's quite difficult with the smaller businesses, to explain what I can do for them.
Tino: All right, but what can you do for them?
Sally: Well-
Tino: In simple terms, what is PR?
Sally: Well I'll give you an example. Somebody I know runs a screenwriting competition.
Tino: A screen, okay-
Sally: So every year he runs a competition. People enter, there's a lot of big names from the TV industry who judge, and the winner will get to meet these big names. So he said to me, "Look, I spent 1,000 pounds on PR last year." I said, "Well, what did you get?" He went, "I didn't get anything." What do you mean you didn't get anything, what happened? Well I went and I said, "Here's my money," and they said, "Yeah, we'll this we'll do that," and then they said, "Well, we contacted a few radio stations, but no one was interested, best of luck."
So I said, "Right, you give me that 1,000 pounds and let's see what I can do." So the following year, I took the 1,000 pounds. I looked at his competition and thought well, the whole point of this is, it's a competition for people interested in screenwriting. So there's no point of it being in say, Women's Weekly, because they might not be interested in screenwriting. So where do I find those people? So the first thing I did was I placed a piece of Broadcast, which is the television industry publication. So I thought that's a good place to start, and how I did that was, because some of the judges were big name people. So if somebody like [inaudible 00:06:38] is behind the competition, you're gonna get a mention.
Tino: Okay.
Sally: So that was the first thing I did, and because I did that, the Royal Television Society did a little news piece on it, and somebody else did. That was rippling away quite nicely. Then I went on to Twitter, and I noticed that one of the judges with the scriptwriter, and I thought oh, a lot of the people have a lot of Twitter followers. If I asked them to tweak this competition, the message might get out there. That was another thing I did. They tweeted it, and the message got out there.
So then I thought, well this guy who has the competition is in Brighton, let's see if we can get some local press. So I got him two local pieces, in the local press, and I got him an interview with the local television station.
Tino: Oh wow.
Sally: Then I thought, well where else the screenwriters go?
Tino: Do you know, for 1,000 pounds that's a lot going on there.
Sally: Exactly. So the final thing was, well a lot of people who want to get into screenwriting go on to blogs, so I got him six guest blogs. He got an increase of 20% in entries that year. So that is what PR is.
Tino: Okay, so getting the message out there.
Sally: Getting it out to the right people, because there's no point telling people who are interested in building, what about this screenwriting contest. It's got to be the right market, the right audience.
Tino: How does somebody pick a good PR person, being that there are so many out there?
Sally: Well they just go with me, and forget about the rest.
Tino: They you go.
Sally: I would just look at their experience really. It's when you meet someone, it's gotta be a good fit for your business. If someone's eyes light up when you're talking about your business to them, they are possibly a good fit. I think instinct is really important.
Tino: So if the person you're talking to gets to be passionate about your business, understands your business, wants to be involved in your business, then that's a good sign I think.
Sally: Yes, because the PR accounts I'm looking after, they're in my mind most of the time. I come up with little ideas, and I email, "Hey I just had this idea, what do you think about this?" You've got to be excited about.
Tino: Is 1,000 pounds a lot of money for a small business to pay out, in your opinion?
Sally: Well, it depends, doesn't it really?
Tino: It does.
Sally: Because he paid out 1,000 pounds the year before, and got nothing. Whereas he paid ... If you had taken advertising space out in those different platforms, it would've cost you a lot more than 1,000 pounds, so I don't think it's a lot of money.
Tino: In my view, 1,000 pounds not a lot of money. You've done your one type of marketing, how are you on social media? What is it that you do there?
Sally: I think social media is really important. Now, when I started in journalism, back in the day, when dinosaurs roamed the earth-
Tino: You're not that old. I'm not that old.
Sally: You'd write a story, and it would go in the newspaper 24 hours later. That felt quite immediate. It's not like that now. Something happens, it's out there in a flash. So that's quite exciting in terms of PR, because you can literally get your message out there right away. So any PR strategy has to use social media, websites, blogs, it's really important. I love social media. I'm totally addicted to Twitter and Facebook.
Tino: Are you?
Sally: Yes, it's terrible. Is a terrible thing, I'm always looking at pictures of cats, and people falling into swimming pools. It's just crazy.
Tino: I had no idea, okay.
Sally: I think blogging is very important, because ... I mean you must, as a technical person you know that it improves your SEO ranking. It keeps your website fresh. It keeps changing. Also, people need to look to you as the chosen expert in that field. PR, I'll go and read that woman's account. So I'm currently doing a series of blogs about social media. It's things like twit proof Twitter, Facebook for four year olds, easy peasy social media, because a lot of people my age say, "Oh, I don't like it."
Tino: Are they business people?
Sally: And they're business people. So my blogs are speaking to them and saying, "Do you know what, it sounds a bit scary, but actually, if I can do it you can do it."
Tino: Yeah, I like you, think social media is a wonderful tool to use. I think every small business you get on board. If you are the type of person who does hands off, and backs off, there are experts out there who can help you, who will do it for you. So just find yourself somebody who can help you in social media. It's really important that you get out there and use it. What else do you do for people?
Sally: I write blogs for people, because I love communicating. So I will write blogs, I will look at website copy for them. I will say, "Look I'm not sure this is working" because there's nothing worse than a website with swathes of sort of words that don't really mean anything. People want to go on and get a really quickly, and because my background is in tabloid journalism, I'm quite good at that, just getting things across quickly. So any kind of copywriting, I can help you with.
Tino: Do you think we live in a world of instant?
Sally: We do.
Tino: We send a message out, we expect an instant reply.
Sally: Yeah.
Tino: And perhaps the small business person, of our age isn't quite there yet.
Sally: No.
Tino: You never can like, "I better check my Twitter account once every six months perhaps." In the meantime somebody has gone, "I want to do some work with you. I want to work with you." And they've given up now.
Sally: That's the thing about social media, you've got to be on top of it. You've got to kind of buy into it. You either buy into it or you don't do it, because if you haven't got somebody monitoring what's coming in, you might have customers asking questions, and if you're not answering back ... That's like having a shop, and being in there, and just waving at the customers outside.
Tino: That's not good. I mean as small business people, we're very aware, we're very good at having a go, but were quite rubbish at building websites. We're quite rubbish at putting content on websites. We're quite rubbish at social media. That's where you can really help us out.
Sally: Yes, I mean the thing about it, I don't build websites. I have someone that builds them for me. So I work with someone else. I work with a designer. I do the things that I'm really good at, and I've got really good people who work with. I've got a great designer. I've got a great web designer, and if got a great photographer. So it's getting those people to work with me.
Tino: How do people find out more?
Sally: Well, they go my website, Wow PR Limited, and send me an email. Phone me, we're gonna have a chat.
Tino: Just remind us of your website address.
Sally: It is www.wowpr.co.uk is that right.
Tino: On Twitter, you're wowprUK?
Sally: I'm @wowprUK on Twitter. I've got a Facebook page.
Tino: Before you go, before we wrap it up, tell us about, are there social media platforms for certain types of businesses, or does it matter?
Sally: There really are, and it is quite complicated, so unless you've got four days. Yes, there are.
Tino: If I were into-
Sally: For example, just say you were an interior designer-
Tino: Yes.
Sally: And you were about image. You were having pictures of lovely rooms. I'd be on Instagram, because it's about the pictures isn't it. It's not really about the words. You've got your hashtags, but it's about, look at this beautiful design. So it's a very, very visual platform. So they're very different. Twitter is quite fast moving and quick, and perhaps your lovely rooms won't get the attention that they deserve. They'll be better off on Pinterest, or Instagram.
Tino: All right.
Sally: And also, what I like about, I mean for example, I have a couple local twitter accounts, and I try and target local followers, because there's no point in getting loads of followers in Dubai, because they want to remove stuff in Surrey. Again, it always comes down to reaching the right audience.
Tino: So to summarise then, if you have a website, and you're looking for some content, please call Sally. You've got her details already, but go to wowpr.co.uk.
Sally: Yes.
Tino: Of even find her on Twitter.com/wowpruk. We, as entrepreneurs were good at something. We're not good at everything, but a strength as you have is being able to accept that you're not strong at everything, and that you have to let go. This is where people like Sally, or just Sally herself can help you. Thanks for watching.
Sally: Thank you.

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Wednesday, 18 July 2018
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